Knitta, Please…

Nothing makes me appreciate analog more than spending way too many hours immersed in digital executions and products. Several years ago when I was learning Java programming, I also developed an insatiable desire to knit, knot, crochet and otherwise do something with my hands and yarn. I used my render times during edits to make scarves and it staved off carpal tunnel. It was the call of the real. It kept me sane. And now, when I see new forms of knitting come up such as the guerilla knitters from Houston called Knitta Please and their many other cohorts creating fabric based grafitti street art and yarn bombing industrial objects, it simply makes me happy that there is no screen, spray cans or pixels to process. Finally a format that really does shock the streets yet knits into our urban fabric. While it does seem a bit in its early stages tea-cozy-esque – I can’t wait to see who takes this format to the next level.

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Hijacking all Screens

This is a link to a white paper I wrote about new media surfaces, art, branding and sponsorship in urban environments and presented at the Urban Screens conference in Amsterdam in 2005 at Club 11.

http://www.firstmonday.org/issues/special11_2/kumra/index.html

Abstract: By tracking the use of non-traditional forms of outdoor advertising in static media there is a strong indicator for time based media (video, animation, interactive and generative video arts) to take a leading role in broadcasting art while serving the goals of the corporations that own these screens. Apart from the initial use of the “video billboard” in commercial and advertising based applications, the city is responding to its new media skin with more creative and interactive executions. Case studies in this paper document some of the first experiments utilising video at the urban screen level and show how the press and public relations value of these projects is more beneficial to the advertiser and the community than spending on traditional advertising.

Harvard/Koolhaas: Project on the City Moscow

During my final semester at the Harvard GSD, I was one of a handful of selected researchers to co-curate a show on Russian 1960′s and ’70s Archictecture and Urbanism in Moscow called Utopian?

The show was in conjunction with the Russian government and scheduled to take place at the state run MUAR, the Schusev Museum of Architecture.

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